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Kept : a Victorian mystery / D.J. Taylor.

By: Taylor, D. J. (David John), 1960-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, ©2007Edition: 1st ed.Description: 463 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0061146080; 9780061146084.Subject(s): Great Britain. Metropolitan Police Office -- Fiction | Great Britain. Metropolitan Police Office | Great Britain. Metropolitan Police Office -- Fiction | Train robberies -- Fiction | Collectors and collecting -- Fiction | Mentally ill women -- Fiction | Poachers -- Fiction | Women household employees -- Fiction | Swindlers and swindling -- Fiction | Avarice -- Fiction | City and town life -- England -- London -- History -- 19th century -- Fiction | Greed -- Fiction | Grief -- Fiction | Friendship -- Fiction | Avarice | City and town life | Collectors and collecting | Mentally ill women | Poachers | Swindlers and swindling | Train robberies | Women household employees | England -- London | Train robberies -- Fiction | Collectors and collecting -- Fiction | Mentally ill women -- Fiction | Poachers -- Fiction | Women household employees -- Fiction | Swindlers and swindling -- Fiction | Avarice -- Fiction | City and town life -- England -- London -- History -- 19th century -- Fiction | 1800-1899Genre/Form: Mystery fiction. | Detective and mystery fiction. | Fiction. | History. | Mystery fiction. | Detective and mystery stories. | Mystery fiction.Summary: A talented and versatile writer, author of The Comedy Man (2001) and a biography of George Orwell (2003), Taylor presents a literary Victorian mystery that combines a Dickensian cast of characters with the dark foreboding of Poe. In a story ostensibly about a madwoman whose husband, Henry Ireland, dies in questionable circumstances, finding the killer is ancillary to a journey into the human psyche. Mr. Dixey, a naturalist whose country manse contains rare specimens of stuffed and live wildlife, also houses Henry's distraught widow: her precarious sanity is secure in protective isolation. Dixey's shady proclivities lead him to a con man whose opportunism makes financial captives of people of all classes. The novel's deliciously drawn-out pacing mirrors Victorian literature, as does the wonderfully descriptive language ("skeins of birds," "mournful in the gloaming") and sophisticated vocabulary ("encomia pronounced over his catafalque"). A refreshing lack of unbelievable coincidences reflects a more modern style: each person's story realistically demonstrates the author's conclusions about the things we collect and the people we cannot. Book groups will enjoy this one.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Standard Kirkland Campus
General PR 6070 .A9118 K47 2007 Available 30579004227085
Total holds: 0

"Originally published in a different form in Great Britain in 2006 by Chatto & Windus"--Title page verso.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 455-463).

A talented and versatile writer, author of The Comedy Man (2001) and a biography of George Orwell (2003), Taylor presents a literary Victorian mystery that combines a Dickensian cast of characters with the dark foreboding of Poe. In a story ostensibly about a madwoman whose husband, Henry Ireland, dies in questionable circumstances, finding the killer is ancillary to a journey into the human psyche. Mr. Dixey, a naturalist whose country manse contains rare specimens of stuffed and live wildlife, also houses Henry's distraught widow: her precarious sanity is secure in protective isolation. Dixey's shady proclivities lead him to a con man whose opportunism makes financial captives of people of all classes. The novel's deliciously drawn-out pacing mirrors Victorian literature, as does the wonderfully descriptive language ("skeins of birds," "mournful in the gloaming") and sophisticated vocabulary ("encomia pronounced over his catafalque"). A refreshing lack of unbelievable coincidences reflects a more modern style: each person's story realistically demonstrates the author's conclusions about the things we collect and the people we cannot. Book groups will enjoy this one.

"Originally published in a different form in Great Britain in 2006 by Chatto & Windus"--T.p. verso.