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The last man / Mary Shelley ; edited by Hugh J. Luke, Jr. ; introduction to the new Bison books edition by Judith Tarr.

By: Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, 1797-1851.
Contributor(s): Luke, Hugh J, 1932- | Luke, Hugh J, 1932-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Beyond Armageddon: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, ©2006Description: xi, 344 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780803293502; 080329350X.Subject(s): Twenty-first century -- Fiction | End of the world -- Fiction | Plague -- Fiction | End of the world | Plague | Twenty-first century | Twenty-first century -- Fiction | End of the world -- Fiction | Plague -- FictionGenre/Form: Fantasy fiction. | Fiction. | Fantasy fiction. | Fantasy fiction. | Science fiction.Online resources: Table of contents | Contributor biographical information | Publisher description Subject: Best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley wrote The Last Man eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband Percy's death. It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague. The Last Man also functions as an intriguing roman-a-clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Standard Kirkland Campus
General PR 5397 .L3 2006 Available 30579004230915
Total holds: 0

"A Bison book."

Best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley wrote The Last Man eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband Percy's death. It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague. The Last Man also functions as an intriguing roman-a-clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters.

"Bison books"--P. [i].

Originally published by University of Nebraska Press: 1965.