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Ecology and control of introduced plants / Judith H. Myers, Dawn Bazely.

By: Myers, Judith H, 1941-.
Contributor(s): Bazely, Dawn, 1960- | Bazely, Dawn, 1960-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Ecology, biodiversity, and conservation: Publisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003Description: xiv, 313 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0521355168; 9780521355162; 0521357780; 9780521357784.Subject(s): Invasive plants | Invasive plants -- Ecology | Plant invasions | Plant conservation | Invasive plants | Invasive plants -- Ecology | Plant conservation | Plant invasions | Invasie (biologie) | Planten | Beheersing | Ecologie | Invasion Biologie | Pflanzen | Umweltschaden | Umweltschutz | Pflanzenökologie | Artenschutz | Neophyten Botanik | Kanada | Introduced species | Weeds | Plant pests | Introduced plants | Biological control | Plant communities | Plant competition | Herbivores | Population ecology | Life history | Plant diseases and disorders | Models | Transgenic plants | Plantes envahissantes | Plantes envahissantes -- Écologie | Plantes -- Envahissement | Plantes -- Conservation | Invasive plants | Invasive plants -- Ecology | Plant invasions | Plant conservationGenre/Form: Aufsatzsammlung.Online resources: ebrary | MyiLibrary | Sample text | Table of contents | Contributor biographical information | Publisher description | The Class of 1924 Book Fund Home Page
Contents:
Introduction -- Planet of weeds: exotic plants in the landscape -- Biological invasions in the context of plant communities -- Predicting invasiveness from life history characteristics -- Population ecology and introduced plants -- Introduced plant diseases -- Biological control of introduced plants -- Modeling invasive plants and their control -- Action against non-indigenous species -- Genetically modified plants and final conclusions.
Summary: The global spread of plant species by humans is both a fascinating large scale experiment and, in many cases, a major perturbation to native plant communities. Many of the most destructive weeds today have been intentionally introduced to new environments where they have had unexpected and detrimental impacts. This book considers the problem of invasive introduced plants from historical, ecological and sociological perspectives. We consider such questions as 'What makes a community invasible?', 'What makes a plant an invader?' and 'Can we restore plant communities after invasion?' Written with advanced students and land managers in mind, this book contains practical explanations, case studies and an introduction to basic techniques for evaluating the impacts of invasive plants. An underlying theme is that experimental and quantitative evaluation of potential problems is necessary, and solutions must consider the evolutionary and ecological constraints acting on species interactions in newly invaded communities.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Standard Kirkland Campus
General SB 613.5 .M94 2003 Available 30579004072630
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 271-300) and index.

Introduction -- Planet of weeds: exotic plants in the landscape -- Biological invasions in the context of plant communities -- Predicting invasiveness from life history characteristics -- Population ecology and introduced plants -- Introduced plant diseases -- Biological control of introduced plants -- Modeling invasive plants and their control -- Action against non-indigenous species -- Genetically modified plants and final conclusions.

The global spread of plant species by humans is both a fascinating large scale experiment and, in many cases, a major perturbation to native plant communities. Many of the most destructive weeds today have been intentionally introduced to new environments where they have had unexpected and detrimental impacts. This book considers the problem of invasive introduced plants from historical, ecological and sociological perspectives. We consider such questions as 'What makes a community invasible?', 'What makes a plant an invader?' and 'Can we restore plant communities after invasion?' Written with advanced students and land managers in mind, this book contains practical explanations, case studies and an introduction to basic techniques for evaluating the impacts of invasive plants. An underlying theme is that experimental and quantitative evaluation of potential problems is necessary, and solutions must consider the evolutionary and ecological constraints acting on species interactions in newly invaded communities.