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The Victorian world picture : perceptions and introspections in an age of change / David Newsome.

By: Newsome, David, 1929-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, 1997Description: x, 310 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0813524547; 9780813524542; 0813527589; 9780813527581.Subject(s): Great Britain -- History -- Victoria, 1837-1901 -- Historiography | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1837-1901 -- Historiography | Historiography -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Great Britain -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | Social change -- Historiography | World history -- Historiography | Historiography | Intellectual life | Diplomatic relations -- Historiography | Social change -- Historiography | World history -- Historiography | Great Britain | Victoriaanse tijd | Nationaal bewustzijn | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- Historiography | Great Britain -- History -- Victoria, 1837-1901 -- Historiography | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1837-1901 -- Historiography | Historiography -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Great Britain -- Intellectual life -- 19th century | Social change -- Historiography | World history -- Historiography | Victoriaanse tijd | Nationaal bewustzijn | 1800-1901 | Geschichte 1837-1901 | Great Britain Foreign relations Historiography 1837-1901 | Great Britain History Historiography Victoria, 1837-1901 | Great Britain Intellectual life 19th century | Historiography History 19th century Great Britain | Social change Historiography | World history HistoriographyGenre/Form: History.
Contents:
Introduction : observation of one's times -- pt. I : Looking inwards -- It has all been so sudden -- It's this steam, you see -- The poor in a loop is bad -- The spirit of utility -- What is it to be a gentleman? -- God preserve me from being poor -- pt. II : Looking outwards -- Rule, Britannia! -- Entering upon most dangerous times -- Our approaching decrepitude -- The British Empire divinely ordained -- pt. III : Looking before and after -- The favourite reading -- Great men are profitable company -- For was, and is, and will be -- Doat upon the Middle Ages -- pt. IV : Looking beyond -- An after-life -- Mr. Darwin's theory not atheistical -- This world's no blot for us -- pt. V : Looking ahead -- Mammon worship a melancholy creed -- Everything was going to be different -- Conclusion : looking retrospectively.
Summary: David Newsome's monumental history, The Victorian World Picture, takes a good, long look at the Victorian age and what distinguishes it so prominently in the history of both England and the world. The Victorian World Picture presents a vivid canvas of the Victorians as they saw themselves and as the rest of the world saw them.Summary: Situated between the watershed of the French Revolution in 1789 and the fin-de-siecle, the Victorians' world was one of rapid change. Whether they greeted it with hope and exhilaration or with mounting apprehension, there was general acknowledgment among contemporary thinkers and commentators that they were destined to live in uncommonly stirring times. The Victorian intellectual world in full bloom counted among its luminaries Dickens, Carlyle, Eliot, Arnold, Ruskin, Southey, and Wordsworth. But it was also a time of unprecedented population growth, massive industrialization, and an acceleration in the pace of life due in part to improved transportation, especially the advent of the railway.Summary: Darwinian theory shook people's religious beliefs and foreign competition threatened industry and agriculture. The defeat of Napoleon in 1815 and the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy had created profound unease and political tension that lasted into Queen Victoria's reign. Even the books that the Victorians read and their interpretations of history reveal a conflict between unbounded belief in progress and a nostalgic yearning for the values of the past. The transformation of the world of the Victorians was social, cultural, intellectual, economic and political - in a sense, earth-shaking. David Newsome weaves all these strands of Victorian life into a compelling evocation of the spirit of a fascinating time that laid the foundation for the modern age.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Standard Kirkland Campus
General DA 550 .N49 1997 Available 30579004026909
Total holds: 0

Originally published: London : J. Murray, 1997.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-294) and index.

David Newsome's monumental history, The Victorian World Picture, takes a good, long look at the Victorian age and what distinguishes it so prominently in the history of both England and the world. The Victorian World Picture presents a vivid canvas of the Victorians as they saw themselves and as the rest of the world saw them.

Situated between the watershed of the French Revolution in 1789 and the fin-de-siecle, the Victorians' world was one of rapid change. Whether they greeted it with hope and exhilaration or with mounting apprehension, there was general acknowledgment among contemporary thinkers and commentators that they were destined to live in uncommonly stirring times. The Victorian intellectual world in full bloom counted among its luminaries Dickens, Carlyle, Eliot, Arnold, Ruskin, Southey, and Wordsworth. But it was also a time of unprecedented population growth, massive industrialization, and an acceleration in the pace of life due in part to improved transportation, especially the advent of the railway.

Darwinian theory shook people's religious beliefs and foreign competition threatened industry and agriculture. The defeat of Napoleon in 1815 and the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy had created profound unease and political tension that lasted into Queen Victoria's reign. Even the books that the Victorians read and their interpretations of history reveal a conflict between unbounded belief in progress and a nostalgic yearning for the values of the past. The transformation of the world of the Victorians was social, cultural, intellectual, economic and political - in a sense, earth-shaking. David Newsome weaves all these strands of Victorian life into a compelling evocation of the spirit of a fascinating time that laid the foundation for the modern age.

Introduction : observation of one's times -- pt. I : Looking inwards -- It has all been so sudden -- It's this steam, you see -- The poor in a loop is bad -- The spirit of utility -- What is it to be a gentleman? -- God preserve me from being poor -- pt. II : Looking outwards -- Rule, Britannia! -- Entering upon most dangerous times -- Our approaching decrepitude -- The British Empire divinely ordained -- pt. III : Looking before and after -- The favourite reading -- Great men are profitable company -- For was, and is, and will be -- Doat upon the Middle Ages -- pt. IV : Looking beyond -- An after-life -- Mr. Darwin's theory not atheistical -- This world's no blot for us -- pt. V : Looking ahead -- Mammon worship a melancholy creed -- Everything was going to be different -- Conclusion : looking retrospectively.

Originally published: London : J. Murray, 1997.